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days but it would take three long weeks for those ends to hatch. the civil rights movement taught me patience, to never give up and never give in but keep your eyes on the prize, so this book, "across that bridge," is about patience, about steady hope, truce, love and reconciliation. when i was growing up in alabama, visit the tuskegee and later starred in national tennessee and lived in alana. sissons salles white men, colored men, white women, colored women. when i was a child with my mother, father, parents and grandparents why? and they would say that's the way it is. don't get in the way. don't get in trouble. but 1955 at the age of 15i heard of rosa parks. i heard of martin luther king, jr.. at the age of 17 aye rosa parks. the next year at the age of 18i met dr. martin luther king jr.. the action of rosa parks to the people of montgomery and teaching the leadership of dr. king inspired me to get in the way to get in trouble so for more than 50 years i've been in trouble, unnecessary trouble. [applause] so, across that bridge is a lesson about getting in trouble, and that's wha
they are at a disadvantage, i completely agree with kleiza rice that the civil rights issue of our day is school choice and the disaster of the public schools, it is a universal law of nature that everything run by the government will become worse and more expensive over time. everything that is sold on the private market will become better and less expensive over time. like flat screen tv's, cell phones. versus the post office, public schools, and amtrak food service. and by the way, our entire health care is now going to be put in the hands -- in the capable hands of the federal government. >> one more school thing. also from "the new york times." >> i disagree. >> you may not. four decades after clashes, bottom of the again debates school busing. nearly four decades after the city was convulsed by violence over court-ordered segregation, boston is working to reduce its reliance on busing at a school system now made up of largely minority students. although court-ordered busing ended more than two decades ago, only 13% of students in boston, 13% in the public schools, today are white. and the school
of republicans pushing civil rights legislation, antipole tax legislation, anti-link legislation. public accommodations legislation with the democrats constantly blocking, blocking, blocking and the tricks they use these were liberal democrats. they weren't conservative democrats. you just become so frustrated that i think nixon was absolutely right. you can hear the frustration in the speeches he gave about it he said the building trades have been given long enough to -- to -- to voluntarily integrate their work forces. if they're going -- i've had it now. if they refuse to hire black people, we're going to get results now. so i supported it back then i think he was right. >> let me just add one other person's thought on affirmative action and get your response and then we'll start taking calls. this is a piece in the "new york times" this morning by a gentleman by the name of thomas eppenshade. no longer separate equal race in college, an elite college admission and college life he's the professor in [ indiscernible ] he believes affirmative action is beneficial but doesn't believe the
said they are considering overturning the civil rights but it's a narrow provision of that. >> this is a hit to the commonwealth court judge who this week's blocked the voter i.d. law. he made it clear he was only doing it in the context of this election because he didn't think the state could be ready. so this is an issue that naacp and aclu have been trying to use. >> last month, vladimir putin endorsed president obama's reelection campaign. i'm sure the campaign was thrilled by it. he got another interesting endorsement from hugo chavez. he said if i were american i would vote for obama. and if he was in venezuela election, he would vote for chavez. >> this is north dakota for reminding us you can have fabulous economic success if government gets out of the way. they had a mindboggling piece, the heart of north dakota oil fracking boom has doubled the average income over the last five years making it the top hundred richest counties in the countries. they quoted an excerpt saying that right now, north dakota is using 2,000 new millionaires a year. >> paul: this is the hi
-conscious policy violated her civil and constitutional rights. in 2003 the supreme court endorsed the use of ra as a factor in freshmen admissions. so, representative edwards, is affirmative action still necessary? >> absolutely, i think the commitment of the american dream actually rests with affirmative action, it requires it, i hope the supreme court does the right thing. >> i think that we're looking at different neutral different alternatives in talking about these issues on affirmative action. >> yeah, i agree. unfortunately until we start making serious changes in education system and i think it's necessary, affirmative action is necessary for inclusion and for diverse environment in the university system. >> i think 'farmtive action has become a crutch that we aren't revisiting education and how we're failing so many of our kids. until we do that maybe we do need it but i think we have failed our kids by not improving education. >> there was a very interesting article in "the atlantic" which is progressive publication talking about how affirmative action was giving higher scores to lati
york mercantile exchange, civil right attorney mya wiley. attorney raul ruiz and a contributor to "the nation" magazine. thank you for being here. let me ask a question, does 7.8% wipe away wednesday night's performance? is that news story over? >> the debates will have the big impact some are predicting. there's post-debate, you know, euphoria for romney supporters and probably a little bit too much concern for obama supporters. the reality is those numbers help obama tremendously. at the same time, obama has the opportunity now to come back and do what he did the very next day. i think that was a key day for him. >> if he had that sort of debate performance and then we'd gotten job numbers that had us stuck at 8.2, then you start talking about a crisis at that point for the campaign. >> we have a chance to make it a much bigger story, precisely because the republicans have been so nice to us and delivered, for example, jack welch. the numbers were entirely fixed. he's been chimed in this morning by steve forbes, also said these have been fixed numbers. they intended for them to go do
come from? >> guest: well, my first political involvement was in the civil rights movement, where i came along at a time when if you were young and idealistic and in the south, that was--you pretty much were drawn to that. c-span: but what got you interested in that? what--what kind of a--what was the home like? >> guest: my family is quite conservative. my father is, i would say, extremely conservative. i--it was--it--it--it... c-span: is he alive? >> guest: yes, he is. my mama, bless her heart, passed on. i sometimes think it may have been my mother's fault. my mother tried--she--she was certainly, i assure you without success, to drill good manners into my head. and in some ways i think that manners are just a formal expression of how you treat people. and in--the way black people were treated before the civil rights movement, it was clear to me, was very wrong. it was an easy call. c-span: were they political conservatives, ideological conservatives, your parents? >> guest: yeah. both republicans, lifelong. c-span: you write a column about your mom. it's the last thing in the bo
. in a "there was a country," ch right about civil war. and larry bowman in at the sumwalt writes about how wrong -- admiral zumwalt. look for these titles in bookstores this coming week and watch for the authors in the near future on both tv and at booktv.org. >> this month as the president of candidates debate, we are asking middle and high school students to send a message to the president as part of the studentcam video competition. in a short video, students will answer the question what the most important issue is in the campaign for 2013. it is open for students' grades 6-12. for complete details and rules, go online to studentcam.org. >> washington journal continues. host: in the segment we will talk about variety. our guest, melanie eversley joins us from new york. welcome. guest: thank you. host: we invited to specifically to talk about what has been happening in pennsylvania. what happened in that state concerning voter i.d.? guest: essentially, pennsylvania was a number of of states -- was one of a number of states across the country attempting to pass legislation that would req
. >> to me, it's against your civil rights. i don't want to get the flu shot and to me it seems like i'm being forced into putting a virus in my body that i object to. >> we need to have a workforce available when the public needs it, if they're sick. and i think people choose to work in a hospital. >> if workers have a medical condition that prevents them from getting the shot, they have to wear a mask. one hospital commented saying, so far all employees have been compliant. >>> the number of cases of fungal meningitis is growing. the cdc reports 47 people have been infected and 12 more than its last update. but as many as 300 people were injected with the tainted steroid that is spreading the disease. it was distributed in 23 states, but has been recalled. five people have died. our chief medical correspondent dr. sanjay gupta has more on this. >> randi, it's worth pointing out, again, that we're talking about fungal meningitis as opposed to bacterial meningitis or viral meningitis. the type that you typically hear about being spread, for example, on college campuses. fungal meningit
've been on it. and i would hope eventually that we would be able to conform with title 6 of the civil rights act which means we'd provide languages for everybody. languages change from time to time. now we're getting more arabic languages and in the future we may get more of the southern african languages based on the number of refugees we see moving around. and we also find the governor and president are willing to provide the dream act. and, so, we have some new hope. but we haven't gotten to the legalization of the undocumented. it has not moved, in spite of the fact mayor bloomberg supports it. and he thinks we need them, and certainly is true and he thinks they would pay taxes and build communities. also, professor silbani from stanford thinks that they will -- are we under two minutes, too? oh, well, i just want to call
offenders and they are cunning and devious and to say their civil rights are violated, the first and 14th amendments, because they can't have a sign, you know, and halloween deck kra decorations to come into hair house, they've forfeited their right to have access to children. >> heather: and the attorney likening it to branding. and mentioning what they need to document let's look at the things required in the ordinance, or this law that was actually passed by the city of simi valley. first of all, a sign they have to post on their door, just says this, doesn't say i'm a sex offender, it says no candy or treats at this residence. they have to leave all exterior decorative and ornamental lighting off, 5:00 p.m. to midnight and, refrain from decorating their front yard and house exterior and don't answer the door to children trick-or-treating. >> essentially they are saying, you cannot try to lure these children. we know this is what you do. and we know you want children and know to -- sex with it i should say and you will not change your behavior and here, at the end of the day, when the
the oakland police department? civil rights attorneys are explaining why they are asking for a federal takeover. a motion was filed to put the department in receivership, for them the final straw was the latest federal monitoring report that provided no hope the monitor criticized the department's handling of officer involved shooting and oakland demonstration. >> we can't wait for more empty promises. we can't wait for officers, many of whom, most of whom are doing a great job here at oakland, to fail to get the training and supervision that they need. >> on the flip side the mayor and the police chief have said they believe the department is moving in the right direction and will work to keep it under control control. >> it wasn't the first time prosecutors claim a morgan hill mother used her 10-year-old daughter more than once to shoplift. prosecutors say when employees spotted marcie stealing on september 19th it was her second attempt. they were unable to catch her two weeks earlier. she was charged with commercial burglary and a count of contributing to the delinquency of a minor
's against your civil rights. i don't want to get the flu shot. and to me it seems like i'm being forced into putting a virus in my body that i object to. >> we need to have a workforce available when the public needs fit they are sick and people choose to work in a hospital. >> if workers have a medical condition that prevents them from getting the shot they have to wear a mask. >>> the unemployment rate fell in september. more people returned to the labor force and hiring was steady. in this week's smart is the new rich meet one guy who took a big risk to make a career change in a brightening job market. here's christine romans. >> reporter: he wanted to switch careers from operations in i.t. to marketing and big data. in a slow jobs market that takes training and risk. >> i decided to go back to business school and i went part time and realized that i needed even more training so i left my full time position and gained internship at cbs. and that was a great gateway. so the internship plus the mba, i was able to fortunately land at met life. looking at the data more on the marketing
in the summer that year when the rising tide in the fight for civil rights swept across the nation. thousands of young people my age or heading to mississippi to try to break the back of segregation in the south. i was living in cambridge at the time. one day i simply got in my car. this was the 1916s. it was a little par. and i drove across town into the black community. i had never been in the black community before although i had grown up just outside of boston and i went to a minister, a wonderful man, some of you may recall his name. a revered figure in the black community and some close associate of dr. king and i asked him simply may i be of use? and he said yes, young man, you can. and he said i am glad you are here to talk to me in your own home town because you don't need to go to mississippi to find injustice in america. he said you can join the struggle here. come into schools and try to help our children. i walked into the headquarters of boston public school and said i am going to be a teacher. i had never heard of certification. i knew nothing about teaching. didn't teach anyth
. he missed out on the civil rights movement, and on the new left. but he determined to experience them vicariously. and so he tried drugs, as he confesses in his autobiography. he rallied against south africa, he gave political speeches, he community organized, he tried to get in touch with the black experience, and in general, he searched for meaning to use a formulation that he would not reject. in other words, he very much shared the '60s mood that everyone must find his own meaning in life. and find his own way in life. because there's no meaning out there, there's no objective source of meaning that one can point to or rely on. he shared the right to make history rather than to let it happen or trust it to redeem in justice in the own good time. and as well obama, i think, shared the post modernist suspicious that universal values, as he sometimes calls them, are not universal, and probably not true in any objective sense. one can see these ideas at work in dreams for my for, the heavily fictionalized autobiography or memoir he wrote. now politicians are known to lie. this is not
strong. right up prior to the war. that's how big the u.s. army was. during the civil war the army expanded to. 3-million people. 2 and a half people or so in the north. and this meant that the amount of case work that he had to oversee was extraordinary and he also was given responsibility for pursuing civilians who were engaged in disloyal acts. treason behavior and so on. he didn't pursue every case. he didn't serve on every case himself. obviously a lot of court marshall went on the field. it was his responsibility to make sure that justice was -- as much as he could that justice was prevailing in the cases and punishment was being weeded out as it should be and people's rights were being protected. it was a massive assignment that went way past the end of the war. he stayed in the position until 1875 pfs it a expanded position. he had the role in that that position of making law. so much law about war didn't even exist because this was a war the likes of which the the united states had never see. so many, many policy around how the war should be conducted and it needed to be c
at that time home. public safety measure or violation of civil rights. the measure is being challenged in simi valley. five registered second offenders and their families contends in a lawsuit the halloween restriction violates freedom of speech. so what do you think? >> i think it's a positive thing, really. i hate to see it have to happen. but that's the way people are today. >> hard call. i don't think it's necessary to put a sign. i do think it probably would be best not to have a light and a pumpkin open up come here. >> i think they should be banned from that. i think everybody should know exactly who they are and the kids shouldn't even be around them. that's what i think. >> i do feel that it's kind of a civil -- civil liberties issue. and, again, somebody basically what does halloween have to do with the crime that was committed? i don't really want my kid going and trick or treating at a pedophile's house, but that's what i look for as a parent i accompany my young child while they're trick or treating. >> stay with us. 11 fitness is coming up next. >>> they weren't quite ready for t
, he had his right arm amputated after the civil war. and here is one of him as a father, his grandsons and sons follow them into military service, this is very late in life for him. finally, and ultimately, a group shot that shows him right there, along with all the great men of the time who formed the board for bowdoin college. the chamberlain who also, to civil war service, was shown in this picture. he is right there. so those are the two gentlemen. chamberlain and howard were two years apart. chamberlain was class of 52, howard was class of 50. he did share a dorm, but not a dorm room. so we really don't know too much in the early years about whether they were friendly. certainly, later in life, they were. finally, a picture of howard along with other distinguished alums, including chief justice [inaudible name], next to howard, who is also here at bowdoin. this is a nice, gentle motion of the late 19th century. social life in a small town in maine. this is a letter from christmas morning, 1861, howard at the time was in camp california, which is out of the outset of washington dc.
of mothers and accommodation in the church in washington, d.c.. set about right after the civil war and determining how they could provide help particularly to blacks and a variety of disadvantaged in the d.c. area and initially establish what was a seminary and that very quickly martin to the university. so, howard university was founded. you put them on the reservation it would be okay but in terms of his treatment of blacks and his involvement he's also called the christian general because depending on the perspective he was either very powerful or very righteous. he did expect that his troops would comport themselves in the highest christian manner that there are also suggestions he was preaching and maybe not the easiest guy to live with and when you really want to do is smoking cigarettes and have a drink. the reich righteousness i think carries him without life and he makes no apologies for ret but he's also a singled out because of it and certainly on many of the biographies that have been published. ultimately i mentioned earlier that he was the superintendent of west point
of the poor and study the indifference to civil rights. a lot who lived through it seemed to think the best thing about george bush, he is not ronald reagan. ♪ ♪ >> largely as as a result of the policy and priority of reagan administration, more people are becoming poor and staying poor in the country than many times since world war ii. ♪ >> if there's anything left ronald reagan trickle down theory it seems to be anxiety which seems to be trickle down through every segment of our society. ♪ if you give complearns thomas a little flower you think you have david talking. here is a man who is against everything that has lifted the level of life of -- [inaudible] ♪ i egg and butter many black men do a [inaudible] >> has hard too. he's remember rehenceble person. ♪ your words trickle down terrorist who face their agenda on division, exclusion, and fear. do you think middle class americans are in need of protection. ♪ the new republican majority congress took a big step on the legislative agenda to demolish or damage government-aid programs many of them designed to help children an
started to add jobs in government. >> you're right. >> teachers, civil servants, et cetera. i see that as a net positive. >> unless there's a fiscal cliff and you won't be adding government jobs, that's for darn sure. >> let's talk a little bit about the middle, and for the people in the middle, you could argue that the middle class has demand an awful lot over the past 20 or 30 years that sort of led us to this debt problem, led us to this deficit problem. they want homeownership for everybody. we want tax cuts. we want medicare part "d." we want an expansion of safety net programs and then this is what happens. there's no one in the middle to figure out how to pay for all this stuff the middle has been getting. >> and that's really honestly what this election is about. i think one of the things that i found fascinating, although i didn't think they quite got there, is when the two candidates were asked about the role of government, because that's what elections are always about, it seems to me. i mean, yes, you know, it's about turning out your base and about this or that, but i
to think about unique ways to get at the heart of what they care about. there is a history, whether civil or women's rights are workers' rights, were people remember why unions were created in the first place most of the world today has the recollection of what happened. you got paid in number that could not let you live in the town in which you lived. the walk to be an evolution in innovation. -- there will have to be an evolution in innovation. with a take their own money create economic development. -- where they take their own money and create economic development. their own investment managers and seeking out economic development opportunities. that is smart. that is looking at how to get folks work and do something to incentivize the economy to move again. there are a lot of intelligent unions thinking differently about it. there are a pretty powerful group. >> wanting to watch, especially in new jersey and the north east, we cut -- we come from more unionized states. one of the things that is important -- is a growing season between public sector and the trades and private sector.
employees say the requirement violates civil rights. the hospital says it's all for the good of the patients. downpours led to chaos on a florida highway series of crashes sending 52 people to the highway. scene unfolding in front of drivers on i-75 saying all they could do was brace for impact. >> there was just a wall of stopped cars. i did as much as i could to avoid it i mean i had no choice. i had to just hit a car. >> i heard the crashes behind us, i looked back and all i saw was vehicles crashing and flying up into the air. >> all you could do was brace and slam the car in front of you and then you got slam and slammed and slammed. >> no word yet on whether anyone was killed. >> hey, alisyn, dave is off but i'm going to handle some sports now. major league baseball playoffs i love this time year. i would love it more if my phillies were in it. one game playoff after this controversial call. watch this. there are bottles and cans falling short and landing oen fast down in the field. >> what are they so angry about? may have started after a braves player was called out on infield fly ru
. it reads, in any war between the civilized man and the savage, support the civilized man. defeat jah jahad. >> the ones who are putting these ads together, they are entitled to their bigotry and hate and we descend that right. is this what we need? we need more tolerant messages. >> that ad is sponsored by a group known as the american freedom defense initiative. metro has to display the ad by monday afternoon. >>> new tonight at 11:00, a mistake that can't be hidden. the u.s. military spent millions developing a new camouflage uniform for troops in afghanistan. too bad they didn't conceal the troops. james has more. >> in a case of trying to be good enough for everything, but not being good enough for anything. cost the army millions of dollars and put our soldiers at risk. >> the idea was to develop a camouflage pattern that could be used in multiple environments. urban environment, devert environment, and so on. >> phillip is with the washington guardian. awarded the army their hammer award. >> $6 million on development to the uniforms. >> with the wars in afghanistan and iraq, t
a aw away. the boy's mon is planning to file a civil suit next week. >>> and linked to steroid injections. a new outbreak. seven people diedtwo deaths in maryland and virginia. at least 60 reported cases of mennen right? s -- meningitis. latest cases in minnesota and ohio. health officials are trying to contact thousands who received the shots for back pain. the contaminated steroid appears to have come from a pharmacy in massachusetts. this type of meningitis is not contagious. >>> we know the name of the virginia state trooper killed as he ras directing traffic. andrew fox was hit and killed by an suv last night. happened on route 30 near theme park way in hanover county. fox was directing traffic as people left the state fair when the suv hit hill. he was take ton a nearby hospital where he died from his injuries. >>> hours after arriving in the united states, five terror suspects pleaded not guilty today in federal court. suspects fought extradition from england for years. today they were charged with recruiting terrorists and providing terrorist groups with money and equip
demonstrate and right to protest almost any cutback, and they have an absurd welfare state. why are they so upset? increase government along replace civil servants extra for coming to work on time. using a computer. in italy teachers no longer can retire with a fat pension at age 39. there are other cutbacks, but not many. european welfare states are bigger than ours. now growing faster than theirs. is this what we face? once people are used to getting free stuff they fight to hold onto it. our welfare state money will run out. people can't keep voting themselves free stuff. well, i guess they can, but the money will run out. mitt romney expresses let's hear what he says about 47 percent of americans are people. >> government has a responsibility to pay for them. believe they are entitled to the health care. john: entitled. people feel entitled to government handouts, they tend to do this. when governments take some handouts away. this hope, maybe we will learn from what is going on in europe. probably not. americans don't pay much attention. the few countries did reform the welfare state w
be seen again in the history of civilization. climate changes are not imaginary, not theoretical, not based on computer models. it's right there in front of you. >> there is more at bill moyers.com. i'll see you there and i'll see moyers.com. i'll see you there and i'll see you here next time. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com de nrns don't wait a week. to get more moyers visit bill moyers.com for exclusive blogs, essays and video features. this episode is available on dvd for $19.95. to order call or write to the address on your screen. funding is provided by carnegie corporation of new york celebrating 100 years of philanthropy and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the coalberg foundation. independent production fund with support from the partridge foundation. a john and poly guf charitable fund. the cle meant foundation. park foundation dedicated to heightening public awareness of public issues. the herb alpert foundation. the bernard and audrey rapoport foundation. the john d. and kathryn t. mcarthur foundation committed to build a more peaceful wor
reelect president obama. because the stakes are too high. but the forward movement, we saw gay rights. we need to stand up and say we're not secure with the escalation of drone wars or violation of civil liberties. there has to be a movement from people. i'm worried about austerity issues that you raised. you can look at europe, but if you see balancing the budget which i believe is not the short term objective. it shouldic to end joblessness in this country. you will see the balancing of the budget on the backs of working class people, the poor, who have had to bear the suffering of wall street and have not shared in a recovery which is slim but beginning. >> eliot: what you're saying is hugely important. i'm fearful right after the election there will there there will be institutional pressure to solve the fiscal cliff and what they see is the looming deficit that that suddenly all the entitlement programs will be on the table. >> and gives us back in let's be pragmatic, a recession or we're slowly coming out of. but i'm worried about the secret dark money. it may move from the presiden
about if they decide to retry the cases and what about the possibility of civil lawsuits? this could be a lot. >> wow. all right, susan in new york, appreciate it. thank you. >>> new developments today in the shooting that killed a u.s. border patrol agent. the fbi now thinks he may have died by friendly fire. the 30-year-old man was shot and killed this week in arizona. officials initially said he and his colleagues who were wounded in the incident, came under fire after responded to a sensor that went off, but authorities say the only shell casings found at the scene were those belonging to the agents. >> you know, investigators have made progress into the investigation, into agent ivy's death and are looking into the possibility that it was a tragic accident, the result of friendly fire. the fact is the work of the border patrol is dangerous. all of us who wear the uniform know this and yet this special breed of men and women willingly put themselves in harm's way to serve their country and to protect their communities. against those who wish to do us harm. >> that news comes as h
and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave it to the development of what we think of as the united states. it wasn't until the european civilization a rise and began to make use of those harbors and rivers they were obvious so help us think about why it's the geography we spoke upon based to the cultural with the supposition one aspect. >> phyllis do ha and -- that was unable to cross across a land of the voyages of the development of technology will let shortened the distance it did not negate geography. it needed more precious and important as it opened up a new geography to the world conflict system and world trade system. culture and economics and people flow from the geography because what is culture? the accumulated experience of people on the landscape over hundreds of thousands of years that leads to the traditions and habits that can be identifiable. one of the places i have the a identifiable culture is remaining. nobody can mistake that there is a remaining culture that's been formed by the conflict between the inva
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)

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